Be smart, be secure

Investing

At a glance

If you’re looking for a stable and secure investment, property is a solid option. Far less volatile than other investment strategies, an investment property has the potential to deliver consistent rental returns for years to come. While you may start out with a single property, careful consideration and management of your investments could see you grow this to a full and profitable portfolio with the help of a broker.

When purchasing an investment property, you need to think tactically about where you will buy and the type of person who generally resides in this area. Doing your research and having a clear understanding of the market and the areas where property is most likely to increase in value is essential. When considering your budget and return on investment, it’s not just about your rental returns, you need to factor in ongoing costs also.

Frequently asked questions

If you earn less from an investment property than it’s costing you, you’re said to be negatively geared. The motivation to be negatively geared is that it reduces your taxable income and you accept a short-term loss in the hope of a capital gain later.

The cost of having a professional manage your rental property is between seven and ten per cent of your total rental income each week. So, for a property with an average rental return of $550 per week, you would need to pay the agent between $38.50 and $55 per week, which amounts to between $2,002 and $2,860 per year. If you compare this to the time commitment and potential costs you could face if you were to represent yourself at the tribunal, this weekly management fee is marginal.  

Unlike a home loan, costs associated with an investment loan are tax deductible (eg interest, repairs, rates, depreciation, etc). However, be aware that any rental income will generally increase your taxable income. Another key difference is that any appreciation in the value of an investment property (capital gains) is taxed.

Along with the cost of your deposit, you need to account for the cost of building inspections, stamp duty, conveyancing fees and any legal costs.

Ongoing, as the owner of an investment property, you will need to pay council rates, water rates, insurance, body corporate fees, land tax, property management fees, repairs and maintenance costs. 

Recent articles

selling your home View Article

Selling your home? Here are the first steps to take

February 05, 2020

There is more to selling your home than putting up a ‘For Sale’ sign on your front lawn. Here are the first things you should check off your list to help you get a favourable result from your investment and to ensure the process runs as smoothly as possible.

 

Choose a quality agent

Asking family and friends who have purchased or sold a property about their experience is a great way to ensure the agent you’ve enlisted will provide quality service, explains an MFAA accredited finance broker. “A website and promotional material will always highlight the agent in the best possible way, but word of mouth and past client reviews will show their true colours,” she says.

 

Make sure the agent specialises in your area and is someone you feel comfortable around as they don’t just negotiate prices on your behalf, they also act as a mediator and represent you as a vendor.

 

Prepare the paperwork

Getting together all the documents required is a tedious yet necessary part of the process. Before a property can be marketed for sale, your agent requires a copy of the Contract from your legal representative, explains the broker. From a disclosure document to a home loan pre-approval, ensure all the paperwork is prepared in time to ensure it all runs smoothly.

 

Don’t take things personally

Remember this is a business transaction; don’t feel insulted if you receive feedback on the property that doesn’t match how you feel about your home. To ensure you come out with the best deal, remove all emotion and think of your house as a commodity.

 

Your property won’t sell itself

Thinking that your home will sell itself can be a costly mistake. Despite how much you like the way you have it set up, furniture, flooring and painting changes can make a big difference to the property’s wider appeal, and marketing it widely can increase the competition and, therefore, the price.

 

“Engage in a thorough marketing campaign and invest in presenting your property in its best light,” advises the finance broker. “Trusting your agent’s strategy can help secure the best financial result.”

 

Speak to your broker

If you are making a decision to sell, speak to your finance broker to ensure that your plans after selling – whether they are buying a similar property, upgrading or building – are actually feasible.

 

“I always advise clients to speak to their broker first to make sure their plans for post-settlement are realistic,” says the finance broker. “There is nothing worse than selling your home and then not being able to achieve what you had set out to do.”

 

Surround yourself with a good team

When all of the people in your network, including your broker, conveyancer and agent, communicate effectively, you should be blissfully unaware of any minor issues that pop up during the course of the sale, explains the finance broker.

 

MFAA accredited finance brokers must meet the highest industry standards, so they will be able to refer you to a great agent and other professionals that will help make the home selling process flow with minimal stress. Find one here.

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